Tort Law Revision

TORT LAW

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Tort Law Quiz

Test yourself on the principles of tort law.

This quiz selects 50 random questions from the Ipsa Loquitur Tort Law question bank, so the quiz will be different each time you take it. To take all the questions on a particular subject, visit that subject's revision page.

 

1 / 50

For the purposes of the defence under s 4(1)(e) (the state of scientific and technical knowledge) of the Consumer Protection Act 1987, when can a producer show they could not have discovered the defect?

2 / 50

The tort of false imprisonment is actionable per se. True or false?

3 / 50

You are dealing with a claim where the defendant has attempted to exclude liability against another business for negligence. Which Act determines whether the notice is valid?

4 / 50

What four things must a secondary victim establish to show that the defendant owes them a duty of care to avoid causing psychiatric harm?

5 / 50

Can liability be excluded for a breach of the Occupiers Liability Act 1984?

6 / 50

If the defendant did not directly cause a nuisance themselves, what must that the claimant show to demonstrate the defendant is responsible for a private nuisance? (Two answers)

7 / 50

What three factors indicate that damages in lieu of an injunction should be granted in an injunction claim?

8 / 50

Which case is authority for the proposition that there is no general liability for omissions in English law?

9 / 50

When is the defence of volenti non fit injuria unavailable to the defendant?

10 / 50

What is the purpose of damages in tort?

11 / 50

What kinds of damage cannot be recovered using a claim under the Consumer Protection Act 1987?

12 / 50

The claimant alleges that a local authority harmed them by making or failing to make a decision involving the exercise of discretion with policy considerations. When will the local authority owe a duty of care in this case?

13 / 50

The claimant has sued the defendant for false imprisonment. They claim that they initially consented to the detention, but later withdrew their consent. The defendant shows that it would be very costly and inconvenient to put this withdrawal of consent into effect. Is the defendant liable for false imprisonment?

 

14 / 50

What is the significance of the claimant establishing the doctrine of res ipsa loquitur?

15 / 50

When will an act of nature break the chain of legal causation?

16 / 50

What standard of care is imposed on children in the tort of negligence?

17 / 50

What factors are relevant to whether the claimant waived liability for risk for the purposes of volenti non fit injuria? (Five answers)

18 / 50

For the purposes of occupier's liability, who is a visitor?

19 / 50

The police may normally rely on their powers of arrest and stops as a defence to a personal interference tort claim. When is this not the case?

20 / 50

In private nuisance, what is the effect on the assessment of reasonableness that the claimant's use was especially sensitive to the nuisance?

21 / 50

The defendant performed surgery on the claimant. They first informed the claimant about the nature and purpose of the surgery, but did not inform them of serious risks of injury involved. The claimant agreed to the surgery. The claimant then sues the defendant in the tort of battery, claiming that they did not give valid consent. Is the claimant correct?

 

22 / 50

Does the claimant need to be aware they are being detained to establish the tort of false imprisonment?

23 / 50

Where the claimant is a rescuer, what must the defendant show to establish he did not take due care?

24 / 50

What two elements must the claimant show to demonstrate that the defendant is vicariously liable for the torts of another?

25 / 50

Is a latent defect in a building or property pure economic loss?

26 / 50

When will an act of a third party break the chain of legal causation?

27 / 50

What must the claimant who is a trespasser show to demonstrate that a duty is owed to them under the Occupiers Liability Act 1984? (Three answers)

28 / 50

What are the 'trio of considerations' when establishing the defence of illegality?

29 / 50

When is planning permission relevant to whether a defendant's activity is a nuisance?

30 / 50

When reducing damages for contributory negligence, can the court make a 100% reduction?

 

31 / 50

For the purposes of a duty to inform in negligence, what is a 'material risk'?

32 / 50

When do fire and ambulance services owe a duty to people who request their aid? (Two answers)

33 / 50

What forms of damage are not recoverable in private nuisance? (Two answers)

34 / 50

You are dealing with a claim where the defendant has attempted to exclude liability against their employees for negligence. Which Act determines whether the notice is valid?

35 / 50

Which two elements must be demonstrated to show that there is a 'close connection' between the tort and the defendant's relationship with the primary tortfeasor for the purposes of vicarious liability?

36 / 50

When is a product 'defective' for the purposes of the Consumer Protection Act 1987?

37 / 50

If the claimant is a secondary victim, when will the courts presume that they shared a close tie of love and affection with someone injured in the event? (3 answers)

38 / 50

What must be shown to establish public nuisance?

39 / 50

What are the four matters the claimant must show to establish the rule in Rylands v Fletcher?

40 / 50

What kinds of losses are recoverable under the Occupiers Liability Act 1984?

41 / 50

Which 5 factors are relevant to whether the defendant has breached a duty of care they owe in negligence?

42 / 50

What three elements must a claimant show to establish the tort of intentional infliction of emotional harm?

43 / 50

For the purposes of vicarious liability, what four factors indicate that the tort is within the field of activities entrusted or assigned to the primary tortfeasor by the defendant?

44 / 50

When determining whether the defence of contributory negligence is available, what is the relevance of the claimant being a child?

45 / 50

What state of mind must the defendant possess before a claimant can establish the tort of false imprisonment?

46 / 50

You are dealing with a claim where the defendant has attempted to exclude liability against a consumer for negligence. Which Act determines whether the notice is valid?

47 / 50

Which five of these are exceptions to the rule that there is no liability in tort for omissions in English law?

48 / 50

Complete this sentence. People engaging in consensual ‘horseplay’ are only negligent if...

49 / 50

Which test applies when determining whether there is a duty of care in non-novel cases?

50 / 50

When does a person breach their duty of care?

Your score is


Tort Mind Maps

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If you are a visual learner, these free printable mind-maps are a great way of learning and remembering the key principles of tort. They are available with or without cases. If you want them on a poster in large sizes, you can also purchase these online at the official Ipsa Loquitur Zazzle store.