Tort Law Revision

TORT LAW

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Tort Law Quiz

Test yourself on the principles of tort law.

This quiz selects 50 random questions from the Ipsa Loquitur Tort Law question bank, so the quiz will be different each time you take it. To take all the questions on a particular subject, visit that subject's revision page.

 

1 / 50

If a claimant acquires a cause of action but dies in the process or is subsequently killed, what happens to the cause of action?

2 / 50

What two matters must the defendant show to establish the defence of volenti non fit injuria?

3 / 50

Do local authorities owe parents a duty of care when conducting investigations into allegations of child abuse?

 

4 / 50

Who can bring an action for public nuisance? (Two answers)

5 / 50

What must the claimant show to establish that negligently inflicted harm is sufficiently non-remote?

6 / 50

What state of mind must the defendant possess before a claimant can establish the tort of false imprisonment?

7 / 50

If the defendant owes the claimant a duty to inform them as to the risks involved in an activity, what risks must the defendant tell the claimant of to fulfil the duty?

8 / 50

What standard of care is imposed on children in the tort of negligence?

9 / 50

Which of the following are 'occupiers' of land? (Two answers)

10 / 50

What factors are relevant to whether a product is defective for the purposes of the Consumer Protection Act 1987? (Five answers)

11 / 50

What is the significance of the claimant establishing the doctrine of res ipsa loquitur?

12 / 50

Can liability be excluded for a breach of the Occupiers Liability Act 1957?

13 / 50

Which test applies when determining whether there is a duty of care in non-novel cases?

14 / 50

How does a claimant establish factual causation in tort?

15 / 50

What kinds of damage cannot be recovered using a claim under the Consumer Protection Act 1987?

16 / 50

If a risk arising from land is obvious, what must the occupier do to warn visitors to discharge their duty of care under the Occupiers Liability act 1957?

17 / 50

If the escape in issue in a Rylands v Fletcher kind of case was caused by an act of nature, is the defendant liable?

18 / 50

What four things must a secondary victim establish to show that the defendant owes them a duty of care to avoid causing psychiatric harm?

19 / 50

To establish the tort of battery, what three elements must the claimant show?

20 / 50

The standard of care in negligence lowered for learners, trainees or the inexperienced. True or false?

 

21 / 50

Can something which is inherent in how the product operates constitute a defect for the purposes of the Consumer Protection Act 1987?

22 / 50

Polly runs over Gareth in her car, instantly putting him in a coma. As part of his damages for a successful negligence claim, can Gareth claim compensation for loss of amenity?

 

23 / 50

What type of harm must a secondary victim of psychiatric harm in negligence show was foreseeable to establish that their loss was not too remote?

24 / 50

What are the elements for determining whether a mandatory injunction should be granted? (Four answers)

25 / 50

Is it possible to exclude liability for personal injury or death under the Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977?

26 / 50

What does it mean if the defendant adopted a private nuisance?

27 / 50

When will an injunction be refused despite the relevant test being met? (Three answers)

28 / 50

For the purposes of the defences to the Consumer Protection Act 1987, when is 'the relevant time'? (Three answers)

29 / 50

What 4 conditions must be met before the defendant is deemed to have 'assumed responsibility' for the claimant's pure economic loss (and therefore owe the claimant a duty of care)?

30 / 50

The claimant alleges that the practical manner in which the local authority implemented a decision harmed them. When will a duty of care be owed by the local authority?

31 / 50

What must be established to hold a supplier who is not primarily liable under the Consumer Protection Act 1987 liable for defects in a product?

32 / 50

What is the 'event' that the secondary victim must have been in close proximity to?

33 / 50

What factors are relevant to whether the defence of illegality is established? (Four answers)

34 / 50

The default rule is that an injunction will be granted to restrain any public or private nuisance. True or false?

 

35 / 50

When will an act of nature break the chain of legal causation?

36 / 50

For the purposes of vicarious liability, what four factors indicate that the tort is within the field of activities entrusted or assigned to the primary tortfeasor by the defendant?

37 / 50

When is the defence of volenti non fit injuria unavailable to the defendant?

38 / 50

What must the claimant show to establish the tort of assault?

39 / 50

What type of harm must a primary or consequential victim of psychiatric harm in negligence show was foreseeable to establish that their loss was not too remote?

40 / 50

What does it mean if the defendant continued a private nuisance?

41 / 50

The defendant is being sued for breach of the rule in Rylands v Fletcher. The escape was caused by the deliberate act of a third party. Is the defendant liable?

42 / 50

What two criteria must be established for the doctrine of res ipsa loquitur to apply in negligence?

43 / 50

What factors indicate that a use is 'natural' for the purposes of the rule in Rylands v Fletcher? (Four answers)

44 / 50

What standard of care is owed to a trespasser under the Occupiers Liability Act 1984?

45 / 50

Which factors indicate that Parliament did not intend for a particular statutory provision to give rise to a separate action for breach of statutory duty? (Four answers)

46 / 50

According to the Bolam test, when will a professional defendant not be in breach of their duty in negligence?

47 / 50

In industrial disease cases, what must the claimant show to establish factual causation?

48 / 50

What three matters must the claimant prove to establish the tort of intentional infliction of harm?

49 / 50

What is the purpose of damages in tort?

50 / 50

For the purposes of occupier's liability, who is a visitor?

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